Introduction of the Most Expensive Faberge Eggs on the Planet

Faberge eggs are ornamented eggs that were made by Carl Faberge and his company for the Russian Imperial Family from 1885 to 1916. The family lost many of these eggs during the Russian Revolution in 1917. From there, collectors and museums from all over the world got a hold of some of these eggs. The Faberge community recognizes fifty imperial eggs. 43 Imperial Faberge eggs care located in museums and private collections. These unique eggs are among some of the most expensive and wanted pieces of art in the entire world. In this article, we’re showing you the top 10 of the most expensive Faberge eggs that most people cannot afford to buy.

10 of the Most Expensive Faberge Eggs

Rose Bud Faberge Egg

Michael Perchin made this Faberge egg under the supervision of Peter Carl Faberge in 1895. Perchin made the egg for Nicholas II, who wanted to give it to his wife, the Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, as a present. This was the first egg ever presented from Nicholas to Alexandra.

When you open the egg, you will see a yellow-enameled rosebud, in which two surprises placed. The surprises were a cabochon ruby pendant and a golden crown that had diamonds and rubies in it.

Rosebud #Fabergé egg from Saint Petersburg museum

Posted by Faberge Land on Monday, February 18, 2019
Rose Bud Faberge Egg

In 2004, Viktor Vekselberg bought the egg as part of the Forbes Collection; this collection included other imperial eggs, as well as the Rose Bud Egg. Victor bought the entire collection for over $100 million. 

Viktor is the current owner of the Rose Bud egg and he currently holds the egg at the Faberge Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Some people believe that this expensive Faberge egg could cost up to four million dollars.

Hen Faberge Egg

This was the first fabricated Faberge egg. This egg was fabricated for Tsar Alexander III, who wanted to give it to his wife, the Empress Maria Feodorovna, as an extra valuable Easter egg.

The Hen egg was made from a white enameled shell. When the casing opened, it revealed a very shiny gold yolk. The yolk can open to reveal a multicolored golden hen. The Hen itself can also open showing a replica of the imperial crown made of diamond and gold with a small ruby pendant. Both surprises are missing and considered lost.

The Empress was so impressed by the Hen egg, that Alexander III made Peter Carl Faberge his goldsmith by special appointment. Meaning that Peter Carl Faberge was tasked with creating a new Easter egg every single year. 

The beautiful Hen egg

Posted by Faberge Land on Wednesday, March 25, 2020
Hen Faberge Egg

The egg was sold before as part of the Berry Collection in 1934 for £85 ($430). Viktor Vekselberg was the last person to buy it in 2004; the egg came with other expensive Faberge eggs as part of the Forbes Collection.

Currently, there’s a considerably high estimated value for this Faberge egg; Experts estimate the eggs price at six million dollars, and you can find it in the Faberge Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

The Order of St. George Egg

This egg was created during World War I, and it represents the Order of St. George that was given to Emperor Nicholas II and his son. This was the last Easter egg that the Dowager Empress, Maria Fedorovna, got. She was intended to receive the Karelian Birch Egg as well, but she never did.

This Faberge egg didn’t feature precious stones or extravagant surprises. The egg itself was enameled with a green hue. The sides of the egg include the St. George crosses and medals. If you touch a button, the crosses and medals opened to reveal small portraits of Nicholas II and Tsesarevich Alexei Nikolaievich.

Marvelous Order of St. George Egg

Posted by Faberge Land on Monday, July 13, 2020
The Order of St. George Egg

This egg, as well as the Steel Military Egg, was initially sold for 13,347 rubles. The Order of St. Viktor Vekselberg bought George Egg in 2004 as part of the Forbes Collection. Experts value the egg itself at seven million dollars.

The egg is currently on display at the Faberge Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

The Winter Faberge Egg

This was the most expensive egg ever made at the time. Peter Carl Faberge created it in 1913, and it was a gift from Nicholas II to Tsarina Maria Feodorovna. The egg was designed with diamond, quartz, platinum, demantoid, gold, and orthoclase.

The winter egg

Posted by Faberge Land on Tuesday, March 12, 2019
The Winter Faberge Egg

The surprise that was included was a flower basket. This specific egg was made because of the recurring order of two Easter eggs per year that Nicholas II asked for. It was initially sold for 24,700 rubles.

The last person to buy it was the Emir of Qatar in 2002. He bought it at an auction for $9.6 million, and it’s currently in his private collection.

The Fifteenth Anniversary Egg

This Faberge egg was made under the supervision of Peter Carl Faberge in 1911. It was created as an Easter egg gift from Nicholas II to the Empress Alexandra Feodorovna. This egg also commemorates the coronation of Nicholas II on its 15th anniversary.

The magic of the stunning: The Fifteenth Anniversary Egg

Posted by Faberge Land on Wednesday, July 15, 2020
The Fifteenth Anniversary Egg

The egg includes green and white enamel, rock crystals, and diamonds. It doesn’t include a surprise, and Peter Carl Faberge didn’t provide any explanation for it .

Viktor Vekselberg bought the 15th Anniversary egg in 2004 as part of the Forbes Collection. As for the price of this expensive Faberge egg, experts approximate the value of the egg at $10 million to $15 million. If you wish to take a look at the egg you can visit the Faberge Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

Lilies of the Valley Egg

Peter Carl Faberge supervised the creation of this egg in 1898. Michael Perchin was the goldsmith supervising the operation. It was created as an Easter egg gift from Nicholas II to his wife, the Empress Alexandra Feodorovna. 

the classic – Lily of the valley

Posted by Faberge Land on Friday, February 1, 2019
Lilies of the Valley Egg

The materials used for this egg were mainly enamel, diamonds, gold, pearls, and rubies. The surprise that the egg contained was some portraits of Nicholas II, the Grand Duchess Olga, and the Grand Duchess Tatiana. Johannes Zehngraf painted the portraits.

Viktor Vekselberg bought the egg in 2004 as part of the Forbes Collection. Experts estimate that the value of Lillies of the Valley Egg is at $13 million. Currently presented on display at the Faberge Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia, along with the other eggs.

The Orange Tree Egg

This egg was also known as the Bay Tree egg. Nicholas II received this egg in 1911, as he wanted to give it to his mother, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna. Peter Carl Faberge supervised the creation of this egg.

The Orange Tree Egg

Posted by Faberge Land on Thursday, May 24, 2018
The Orange Tree Egg

the Bay Tree egg includes gold, nephrite, rubies, diamonds, amethysts, pearls, citrines, white onyx, and green and white enamel in its design. The surprise included was a feathered songbird that was inside the leaves of the egg.

Viktor Vekselberg bought the Orange Tree egg in 2004. Nowdays you can see it on display at the Faberge Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The estimated value of this egg is around $15 million.

The Coronation Faberge Egg

Michael Perchin and Henrik Wigstrom created the egg in 1897, under the supervision of Peter Carl Faberge. Michael Perchin created the egg to commemorate the coronation of the Empress Alexandra Feodorovna.

This Faberge egg is made from gold with a translucent lime enamel. The egg includes a guilloche field of starbursts which represent the robe worn by the Empress at her coronation.

The surprise, in this case, was a replica of the 18th-century imperial gold coach. This was the coach that carried the Empress to her coronation back then. 

Another classic set – Coronation egg

Posted by Faberge Land on Monday, February 4, 2019
The Coronation Faberge Egg

Viktor Vekselberg bought the Coronation egg in 2004, he currently holds it in the Faberge Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia. However, the egg frequently exhibited at the Hermitage Museum and some other temporary exhibits at museums all over the world.

Experts estimate that The Coronation egg price tag is at $18 million.

The Rothschild Egg

This unique egg was loved by many Russians loved this egg for its particular color and design This was a fascinating egg. Michael Perchin created the egg in 1902 under the supervision of Peter Carl Faberge. Faberge didn’t create this egg for the Russian Imperial Family.

Béatrice Ephrussi de Rothschild was the customer who ordered the egg. He bought the egg as a gift to Germaine Halphen. The reason for this gift was the engagement of Germaine Halphen to Édouard Alphonse James de Rothschild, Béatrice’s younger brother.

The pink magic of The Rothschild Egg

Posted by Faberge Land on Wednesday, July 15, 2020
The Rothschild Egg

The Rothschild egg is a pink egg with a particular surprise inside: when the clock reaches a certain hour, a diamond-set cockerel appears from the top. In 2014, Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg Russia received the egg. This is the location where you can currently take a glimpse at the egg.

The estimated value of the Rothschild egg is $25 million.

The Third Imperial Egg

The Third Imperial Egg, by far the most expensive Faberge egg that currently exists. Alexander III received the egg in 1887, later on, he gave it to his wife, Maria Feodorovna, as a gift for Easter. August Holmstrom created it under the supervision of Peter Carl Faberge.

August Holmstrom made the egg with an 18-karat gold case, decorated with jewels, white enamel, and diamonds. The surprise that is included in this egg is a 14-karat gold Vacheron Constantin Lady’s watch. 

Third imperial easter egg

Posted by Faberge Land on Sunday, June 7, 2020
The Third Imperial Egg

This egg is not that flashy as other eggs in this list. So what is the reason that makes it the most expensive Faberge egg on the planet? This egg journey is unique and mysterious with a 100-year mysterious gap. The last place on earth you would consider finding one of these jewels.

In 2014, after the egg identified as the missing Third Imperial Egg. An unidentified private collector from the Wartski jewelers bought the egg in an auction in London. Experts estimate that the Faberge egg’s value is around $33 million (for more information about the Third Imperial egg you can read here).

Summery

As you can see the diversity of owners of the most expensive Faberge eggs is not that vast. Most of the eggs on the list belong to one person. There is no doubt that Viktor Vekselberg is a major player in the Faberge field. The positive thing from this post is that most of the eggs are on display in the Faberge museums. Everybody can take a glance at those magnificent jewels of history. But hey if you can’t make the trip to Saint Petersburg museum in Russia, and you cant get your hands on really expensive Faberge eggs. You can always support Faberge Land and purchase one of the Faberge replicas we offer at our store.

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Melissa Egan

There is something almost magical about the Fabrrge Easter Eggs – they are amazing, so much skill! I hope to visit St. Petersburg some day, to see those I haven’t yet seen.